Bluewater Sailboat – Lagoon 400

Overview

The Bluewater Sailboat Lagoon 400 is a yacht that looks good. This catamaran is beautifully made, sensitive to the helm, and comfortable both at sea and in port. It is a fantastic performer in the Southern Seas and is appropriate for all forms of sailing. The Lagoon 400, a charter company favourite for its simple manoeuvrability, is a favourite among all sailors who board it.

One of Lagoon’s third generation designs, which developed from their iconic 410, is the 400. The 400 is still a capable sailor in a breeze even though Lagoon tended to prioritise comfort over performance in this generation. Nonetheless, she is no lightweight and struggles in lighter airs (under 10 knots) unless you have the bowsprit to fly the larger sails (genneaker, code 0 for example). The Sail Area to Displacement Ratio of the earlier Lagoon 410 is slightly higher.

Lagoon 400
Lagoon 400
  • LOA 39′ 3″ (11.96 m.)
  • LWL 37′ 7″ (11.46 m.)
  • Beam 23′ 9″ (7.24 m.)
  • Draft 4′ 0″ (1.22 m.)
  • Sail Area (main, jib) 952 sq. ft. (88.4 sq. m.)
  • Displacement 22,817 lb. (10,350 kg.)
  • D/L 192
  • SA/D 18.9
  • Water 79 gal. (299 l.)
  • Fuel 106 gal. (401 l.)
  • Holding (two heads) 44 gal. (85 l.)
  • Mast Height 66′ 7″ (20.29 m.)
  • Engine Two 30-hp. Yanmars
  • Designers Marc Van Peteghem,
  • Vincent Lauriot Prévost
    (VPLP)

Structure

The Lagoon 400’s basic framework is made up of solid lamination below the surface and balsa core above, including in the decks. Polyester is incorporated into the hulls and decks, and the builder coats the hulls with vinylester resin to act as an osmotic barrier.

One huge canopy on the deck, with a smooth sweep from the cabin front to the aft over the cockpit, effectively creates an outdoor saloon with a spacious lounge area that is brightly illuminated at night by halogen lights above.

In recent years, multihull research has reached a crossroads where one path leads to record-breaking speed machines and the other to ships with all the luxuries of a very luxury home. The brand-new Lagoon 400 unmistakably embodies the latter style, even though its creators have also shown a propensity towards quickness.

The most recent product from Group Beneteau’s multihull division comes from the Marc Van Peteghem and Vincent Lauriot Prévost design studios. The world’s fastest multihulls, most recently the record-breaking trimarans Banque Populaire and Groupama as well as BMW Oracle Racing’s trimaran in the America’s Cup, have been sailed by VPLP for a long time. In contrast, the Lagoon 400 seeks to provide opulent living in an area similar to that of a 60-foot monohull.

Above Deck

Enough of this introduction. The 440 is the most well-liked cat in its size range, and Lagoon is the biggest manufacturer of cruising catamarans in the world. The naval architecture firm Van Peteghem/Lauriot Prevost, which has a long history of producing effective catamarans, is the distinguishing feature of all Lagoon cats. Many people are unaware that Lagoon was initially known for producing high-tech, extremely fast French catamarans like Steve Fossett’s world-record-breaking Lakota. However, today, Lagoon is part of the Groupe Beneteau corporate family, which also includes Jeanneau and CNB, and its boats can be found in charter fleets and private marinas all over the world.

Enough of this introduction. The 440 is the most well-liked cat in its size range, and Lagoon is the biggest manufacturer of cruising catamarans in the world. The naval architecture firm Van Peteghem/Lauriot Prevost, which has a long history of producing effective catamarans, is the distinguishing feature of all Lagoon cats. Many people are unaware that Lagoon was initially known for producing high-tech, extremely fast French catamarans like Steve Fossett’s world-record-breaking Lakota. However, today, Lagoon is part of the Groupe Beneteau corporate family, which also includes Jeanneau and CNB, and its boats can be found in charter fleets and private marinas all over the world.

Below Deck

In the 400, Lagoon has excelled in this area, and the design has endured. There are several variations available, including a 3 cabin owner’s version and a 4 cabin charter version with different head arrangements. We favour the two-headed version owned by the business.

Two separate showers, each with a door and its own space, can fit in the three-cabin, two-head configuration. For a boat of this size, the saloon and galley are fairly spacious, and there is enough of storage under the sofa in the saloon. If you don’t already have one, add a fridge to the cockpit so you can keep one for drinks and one for food. A convenient nav station is also located in the saloon.

If you look below, you will also notice that these boats offer more living space than some of their rivals. There is considerable of storage capacity, and the berths are not too dissimilar from those of a 450.

Performance

The Lagoon 400 will not let sailors down, especially off the breeze. There is a cost associated with having that much living space, but even upwind, you should be able to sail at least 7 knots in a breeze. If you increase the speed before entering the wind, she tacks well. The genoa is manageable (latter Lagoons feature a self tacking jib), and if you have a bowsprit, you have the option of a Code 0. Don’t squeeze her too firmly, though. She will sail up to 45 degrees apparent, just like any other keel cat, although it is advisable to bear away 5 degrees or so to maintain speed and reduce leeway.

The leeway may increase to 20° if you steer too closely to the wind.

She is certainly not bad in this sense, but you could occasionally experience a slam when sailing upwind in a seaway. She can easily claw off a lee shore in a breeze.

The Lagoon 400 sails admirably from 50° to 140° TWA in light winds (10–20 kts). Similar to other cats, opening out the mainsail is prevented by the shrouds, therefore running directly downwind is not really an option unless you have a parasailor or spinnaker. If you have a gennaker to fly from the bowsprit, “tacking” downwind is preferable than bringing the apparent wind forward.

A SOG of approximately half the apparent wind and boat speeds of up to 10 kts are to be anticipated.

If you are considering a 400 on the used market, the square-headed mainsail should be at the top of your list of alternatives because it adds an additional 4.5 square metres (48 square feet) of sail area. The elevated helm station at the port main bulkhead, which has become a Lagoon characteristic for this size yacht, is where all sail management is done.

The running rigging is straightforward; all lines, sheets, and halyards return to the helm, and all work may be done using one of the two manual winches or, if available, the electric winch. Except when you need to add the third reef, which is clipped in at the mast, raising and lowering the main sail while reefing works smoothly from the helm.

Since the arrangement has been kept simple with wide flush decks and recessed hatches, moving about the boat feels secure. The bow lockers include a false floor that gives you a second lower space to store items in addition to easily accommodating all of your lines, fenders, and sails.

The 400 also tacks well when sailing. The roll-up screecher gives one a simple and minimal sail plan that is very simple to power up or down, and the little jib is straightforward to operate. Although this boat shouldn’t be pinched up due to its 75-inch freeboard to the deck, high superstructure, and low-aspect keels, it performs best when driven up and steered away from a closehauled heading.

The use of a square-headed mainsail to increase sail area increases power. The normal full-battened mainsail of the Lagoon is 603 square feet in size; the optional sail offers 65 square feet. When flaking square-headed mainsails, the crew typically have to remove the upper batten(s) from the sail or the sail from the track. However, Lagoon has rigged an innovative line system that automatically tightens the upper luff to the spar as it rises. The sail top simply drops into its bag as the sail is lowered because the rope becomes looser.

Quick Notes

In the last 15 years, Lagoon has produced 2,000 catamarans, and it is well aware of the characteristics of its target market: they like to live comfortably on boats. The Lagoon 400 should blend in seamlessly with the fleet.

That boxy shape generates a lot of windage. Upwind, performance is not great. When you take into account the living space, it is acceptable (trade off).
The interior decor is not renowned for lasting long. Although she lacks a self-tackle jib (some could call this a pro! ), a Lagoon 42 is more straightforward to tacking.

If you’re looking for a used sailboat for sale, check out the Bluewater sailboat data and specs to make an informed decision. Ocean Wave Sail has data for over 10000+ boats that can help you select one to meet your sailing needs.

error: Content is protected !!